QLeft.png Apollo is the God of the Sun and of the arts. Even someone as beautiful and strong as him couldn't stop his sister from falling in love. His anger led to tragic consequences... An excerpt from the play, “Tragic Orion.” QRight.png


Apollo's Background

Karen (icon).png Karen:
Apollo is one of the Twelve Olympians. Represented as a noble god, he was the main deity of Turkey.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
I thought, "Turkey...not Greece?" Well, I looked it up, and apparently it happened often in Ancient Greece.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Many deities from other civilizations were also worshipped in the Greek pantheon.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
When the worshippers of Zeus attacked other lands, they also assimilated their gods.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
That's why the Greek pantheon is composed of several deities surrounding Zeus - the main god.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
The more they increased their territory, the bigger this family of gods grew, and the more relatives Zeus gained...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
If this was a thing in the real world, I don't want to imagine how hard it would've been to greet everyone during the holidays...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Or how much money Zeus would have had to give out in allowances...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Huh? What was I talking about again...?


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Oh, yes, Apollo! He was a noble deity from Anatolia.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Ah! Maybe he became noble because he was the main deity of the Anatolians?


Karen (icon).png Karen:
This could be useful for the play! *scribble scribble*


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Apollo had a twin sister called Artemis.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Both of them were masters of the bow, and their personalities were very similar.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Each liked nature and beautiful things, and they were both a bit too serious and lacked flexibility.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
I'm sure they got along really well as siblings.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Besides, Apollo and Artemis had many retainers.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Apollo, the god of the arts, had the Muses - goddesses of literature, science, and the arts.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
While Artemis brought along the Nymphs when she went hunting.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
One episode tells how Apollo conspired with a Muse.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
He was also the god of music, and a master of the lyre. One day, Marsyas showed up. He was extremely skilled with the aulos, a wind instrument.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Angered that there was someone as well-versed in music as he was, Apollo challenged him to a contest. The terms stated that the winner could do anything he wanted to the loser.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Marsyas proved to be superior to Apollo, but the Muses were the judges.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
And so Apollo was declared the winner of the contest.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
I don't know whether Apollo was full of pride, or he had no pride at all...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Anyway, for the performance I better remember that he wasn't a perfect person.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Other than his myths as god of the Sun, he was also the god of medicine.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
However, originally Apollo was considered the god of disease.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Some stories say that being struck by his arrow led to an instant painless death.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
That's how he became the god of disease.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
And the fact that he could cause disease also meant that he could cure it as well...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
And so Apollo became the god of medicine. He must have been really busy handing out diseases and curing them...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Either way, Apollo possessed several different aspects, which can only mean his worshippers demanded a lot from him.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Speaking of him being the god of medicine, even if not directly related...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
...This aspect connects to the story of Artemis and Orion.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
When Orion died following Apollo's plot, Artemis desperately looked for a healer.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
She asked him to bring her beloved back to life...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Normally, a common doctor wouldn't be enough, but there was one understanding.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Asclepius could bring back the dead. He was the son of Apollo...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
The more I research about Apollo, the more stories pop up here and there.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Apollo is a very difficult role to perform, but it'll definitely be worth it! He has so many different aspects.

Apollo's Fury

Karen (icon).png Karen:
When I first read the script for "Tragic Orion", I posed a question to myself.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
How should I capture the essence of Apollo, and portray him on stage?


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Why did he lead Artemis to killing Orion?


Karen (icon).png Karen:
I guess the logical answer is that he's a god, and this is just a story, but...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
If I'm going to perform as Apollo, and Hikari-chan as Orion, I should think more about it.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
When I read the script, I only knew that Apollo was the god of the Sun and fire, so I tried going from there.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
The Sun is extremely important to all human beings and living things.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Someone described as sunny is usually cheerful and full of energy.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Sunrise and sunset are used to indicate the beginning and end of something...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
The Sun fascinated people in many ways.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
On the other hand, it also symbolizes fiery emotions like jealousy and anger.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
When I thought about it, I could see all these elements in "Tragic Orion" as well.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
His precious twin sister, who knew nothing about love, met with Orion and fell in love with him...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
They grew fond of each other, and this rumor spread to Apollo.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
He must have felt lost when he understood he was going to lose her...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Besides, Orion had a reputation for being a womanizer, and he was a descendant of the Titans, a race that had fought against his father Zeus.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Apollo told Artemis to break up with Orion.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
And I'm sure his anger was like a burning sun.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
But she refused to listen to his words.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
She who was his irreplaceable sister didn't listen to him. Apollo went mad with anger.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
And that's when he proceeded to do the unthinkable.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
He made Artemis kill her beloved with her own hands.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
He chose the worst possible way to end their relationship...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
I think that just shows how angry Apollo was and how much he hated Orion.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
His plan went smoothly. Orion fled from the scorpion and hid in the sea...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Artemis lost her cool when Apollo challenged her, and she released the arrow.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
It struck Orion directly and killed him. What a sad ending to the story of two siblings and two lovers...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
How did Apollo react when he saw hwo heartbroken Artemis was?


Karen (icon).png Karen:
I'm sure once his anger settled down, he felt a huge regret.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
That's also something I had in mind when I performed as him on stage - his regret.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
And then there are other things I found out about him by doing some research... For example...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
After Orion died, Artemis asked Asclepius to bring him back to life.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
However, Hades, the god of the underworld, opposed their plan.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
So Artemis asked Zeus to make Orion into a constellation in the sky.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
This meant that Apollo's plan would ultimately amount to nothing.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
...But it doesn't look like he tried to interfere with her.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
He could have easily stopped Asclepius, or asked Zeus not to listen to her wish.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
...But Apollo didn't do that.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Maybe it's just not recorded in any myths, but I'm sure he didn't.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Artemis' wish came true, and Orion was made into a constellation...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
Once a month, she crosses his path on her chariot. And that's when she meets him again.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
I believe that after the tragic death of Orion, Apollo regretted his plan and didn't fall prey to his own emotions again.


Karen (icon).png Karen:
The Apollo I performed was based on this!


Karen (icon).png Karen:
I have to tell Hikari-chan and Yukishiro-san what I found out!


Karen (icon).png Karen:
That way we'll be able to make our next play even better!

Karen (icon).png Karen:
Apollo was also the god of the arts. Maybe us Stage Girls are connected to him too.

Karen (icon).png Karen:
Apollo sure was the god of so many things... He was the god of the Sun, the god of music, the god of prophecies...


Karen (icon).png Karen:
He must have worked really hard to be able to do so many different things!


Karen (icon).png Karen:
I should follow his example and improve my singing and dancing...and even learn about art theory!

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